Integrated Design Process (I.D.P.)

LEED NC 2.2-registered SLVWD Facilities Consolidation Project exemplifies results arising from the IDP process.

LEED NC 2.2-registered SLVWD Facilities Consolidation Project exemplifies results arising from the IDP process.

Integrated building design or Integrated Design Process (I.D.P.) is the name given to the high levels of collaboration and teamwork necessary to the delivery of a high performance green building project.

Charles Kibert in Sustainable Construction: Green Building Design and Delivery describes I.D.P. as design which, “considers site, energy, materials, indoor air quality, acoustics, and natural resources as well as their interrelationship with one another. In this process, a collaborative team (architects, engineers, building occupants, owners, specialists in indoor quality, materials, and energy and water efficiency) uses systems thinking to consider the building structure and systems holistically, examining how they best work together to save energy and reduce environmental impact”

IDP shown diagrammatically, depicting the ongoing feedback loops in which the original intent is considered holistically, the goals that original design intent are re-examined, tested, reconfirmed, and then integrated towards the intended result.

IDP shown diagrammatically, depicting the ongoing feedback loops in which the original design intent is considered holistically, the goals that original intent are re-examined, tested, reconfirmed, and then integrated towards the intended sustainability goals for the project.

The Integrative Design Guide to Green Building defines a truly integrative design process as one which “optimizes the interrelationships between all the elements and entities associated with building projects in the service of efficient and effective use of resources.”

Traditional design process, in which results deemed irrelevant to the design outcome are gradually eradicated from the design result over the course of the design process.

I.D.P. is characterized by early, intensive collaboration between key members of the design team. Those design decisions fundamental to the intended goal of obtaining a high performance green building are identified and substantively mapped. They are then conscientiously revisited and strengthened through mapping against other competing priorities throughout the entire duration of the design process, thus resulting in the highest, best result within the scope defined for that performance.

The San Lorenzo Valley Water District Facilities Consolidation Project located in Boulder Creek, CA is a LEED NC2.2-registered design exemplifying the benefits of implementing Integrated Design Process. Green building design goals were identified, qualified, and then sorted along with all other priorities,  early on. These initial goals were then shared collectively through the LEED charrette and other collaborative communications with all key members of the project team, resorted, and re-prioritized among all the values brought to the table by the project team, most especially those having to do with projected construction costs. This regimen of evaluation and re-evaluation was adhered to from schematic design, through design development, and culminating in having those goals manifested in the 100% construction contract documents, thus assuring the responsible implementation of those goals once the built project is realized.

More detailed discussion and updates to the status of S.L.V.W.D. Facilities Consolidation Project can be found here. For more information about Integrated Design Process, the American Institute of Architects has identified I.D.P. to be an essential to sustainable design practice. The resources they have compiled are available here.

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